Valley and mountain fold

Post is a part of a larger series (Folds): Valley and mountain fold Swivel fold Sink fold Petal fold Rabbit ear How many folds exist in the origami. If you survey the internet, you will find out that there are many of them (Valley fold, Mountain fold, Inside reverse fold, Outside reverse fold, Rabbit ear, Squash fold, Swivel…

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Axial creases

Post is a part of a larger series (Creases): Hinge crease Ridge crease Axial creases Axial crease is one of the three basic origami creases. By definition Axial creases are creases that run in the direction that is perpendicular to the polygon’s hinge creases. Simplest form of a axial creases In most basic form, meaning in the models…

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Hinge crease

Post is a part of a larger series (Creases): Hinge crease Ridge crease Axial creases A hinge crease serves two purposes. By definition, a Hinge crease is a line that defines polygons by the mere fact it surrounds it. Also, a hinge crease is a line around which a flap can rotate. Hence the name. It looks similar…

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Maekawa-Justin and Kawasaki-Justin theorems

Post is a part of a larger series (Design process): Origami design process (introduction) Origami design process – Part 2 Origami and circles Relationships between basic elements of an origami model Maekawa-Justin and Kawasaki-Justin theorems How to hide an unused paper in your Origami model? Can central flaps be free? Why is central fold opening so popular? Crease…

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Can central flaps be free?

Post is a part of a larger series (Design process): Origami design process (introduction) Origami design process – Part 2 Origami and circles Relationships between basic elements of an origami model Maekawa-Justin and Kawasaki-Justin theorems How to hide an unused paper in your Origami model? Can central flaps be free? Why is central fold opening so popular? Crease…

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Relationships between basic elements of an origami model

All basic elements of an origami model (flaps and rivers) must be in the same relationship, both on the stick figure and the crease pattern. Reason is quite simple. Both stick figure and crease pattern are a graphical representation of the same future model. Therefore, it is not possible for a crease pattern to show one thing and for a stick figure to show something else.

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